HealthTips https://www.allergiesvscold.com Updated Health Articles, Articulos de Salud y Bienestar, Fitness Tips News, Parenting Trending, Comer Vivir Bien y Saludable, Baby and Child Care Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:34:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.2.4 https://i0.wp.com/www.allergiesvscold.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/cropped-cropped-Healthy-Icon-512-x-512-Red-Copy-3-1.png?fit=32%2C32&ssl=1 HealthTips https://www.allergiesvscold.com 32 32 115811984 A Strange New Culprit Behind Eating Disorders https://www.allergiesvscold.com/a-strange-new-culprit-behind-eating-disorders/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:34:39 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/a-strange-new-culprit-behind-eating-disorders/ In 2007, Carlo Carandang, then an attending physician at a hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia, saw a most unusual patient: an 8-year-old boy who had recently adopted some strange beliefs, all while losing 18 pounds. [...]

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In 2007, Carlo Carandang, then an attending physician at a hospital in Halifax, Nova Scotia, saw a most unusual patient: an 8-year-old boy who had recently adopted some strange beliefs, all while losing 18 pounds. The boy thought that nurses were “evil,” and that he could inject other people with his fat cells simply by walking past them.

The boy’s symptoms had begun a few months prior. After his school held a lesson on healthy eating, he started to scrutinize food labels and avoid fat and carbs, according to Carandang, who now works as a data scientist. The boy worried that he was too fat, and he would examine his stomach in the mirror throughout the day. He grew suspicious of what his mother might be putting in his food and began preparing all of his own meals. Before long, he was eating just 200 calories a day.

The boy also developed odd tics, flapping his arms and tapping his mouth to undo what he perceived to be “contamination.” Carandang knew that the boy had always been an anxious child and that he had a history of recurring strep throat. But the food-related symptoms far exceeded what would normally accompany anxiety. The boy was admitted to the hospital, where it took months for Carandang and his team to successfully treat him. Ultimately, the boy had to get his tonsils taken out to stop the strep infections. Around the same time, his eating disorder stopped.

In a report about the patient, Carandang wrote that the boy appeared to have PANDAS, or pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection, a type of obsessive-compulsive disorder that sometimes comes on in children after a bout of strep throat. While PANDAS is a fairly well-established condition, it was unusual that the infection-induced psychological symptoms brought about an eating disorder.

The study seemed to crystallize the connections between infections, obsessive behavior, and eating disorders that Breithaupt and other researchers have been seeing. In her work as a psychologist, Breithaupt says, she has seen patients who, after an infection, “have really rigid thoughts and impressions about either food or weight or its shape, or they might have lots of concerns about fat in foods and fat in their body.” Carandang’s PANDAS patient, too, seemed to first grow obsessed with food, then fixate on avoiding it.

No one knows exactly why, precisely, infections might spark eating disorders. Breithaupt suggests that either the infection itself or the antibiotic used to treat it might be disrupting the patient’s gut microbiome, the vast collection of microorganisms in the intestine that play a role in health and disease. This disruption might change the amount of chemicals called neuropeptides circulating in the gut. Because the gut communicates with the brain, the quantities of neuropeptides circulating in the brain might then change, as well. That could, in essence, make people think differently about food or their body.

Perhaps other mechanisms are at play. One competing theory is that the body’s own immune response to an infection might end up invading the brain. When the body senses a dangerous bug, it produces proteins that destroy the invader. But some of those proteins can also attack our own cells. In possible cases of anorexia or bulimia induced by bacteria, some scientists suspect that these proteins get into parts of the brain that control impulses such as disgust and hunger. There, they might attack the brain tissues or switch on the “I’m not hungry anymore” impulse, or even the “I’m disgusted by my own body” impulse.

There’s no direct evidence for these theories; for now they’re merely speculation. And even if one of them proved correct, researchers would still have to contend with the mystery of why people get infections all the time but relatively few develop eating disorders. Or, for that matter, why not everyone with an eating disorder recently dealt with an infection.

It might be that underlying factors about people predispose them to developing an eating disorder after an infection. “Maybe you have more of a genetic risk for obsessive-compulsive disorder or anorexia, and the infection then unmasks that vulnerability. That’s one possibility,” says Kyle Williams, the director of the pediatric-neuropsychiatry-and-immunology program at Massachusetts General Hospital for Children.

If confirmed, these findings could eventually affect how eating disorders are treated, leading doctors to check if their eating-disorder patients have any lingering infections, Breithaupt says. The results also have the potential to radically change our notion of the many ways eating disorders might originate. While most professionals acknowledge that anorexia and bulimia are deeply psychologically rooted, some eating-disorder patients still face stigma for supposedly being so “vain” as to starve themselves. It’s less likely people would accuse a person of getting meningitis on purpose. Similarly, people who are attacked for compulsively dieting out of vanity might simply be under the spell of antibodies gone awry.

Jim Morris, a professor at Lancaster University in the United Kingdom, says there are still too many unanswered questions to begin treating patients with eating disorders any differently. Instead, he says, this research should prompt a consideration of just how closely intertwined our brains are with our bodies. Just as some problems that seem physical might have psychological aspects, some problems that seem psychological might have physical instigators.

“We say disease is due to biological factors, social factors, and psychological factors all interacting together,” Morris says. “Well, it works with psychiatric disease, as well.”

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]]> 38555 A Warning From a Doctor Who Has Done Thousands of Steroid Injections for Arthritis https://www.allergiesvscold.com/a-warning-from-a-doctor-who-has-done-thousands-of-steroid-injections-for-arthritis/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:34:38 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/a-warning-from-a-doctor-who-has-done-thousands-of-steroid-injections-for-arthritis/ After giving birth to a baby, a young woman told her nurses at Boston Medical Center that she was having pain in her hip. That happens sometimes after births, says Ali Guermazi, one of the [...]

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After giving birth to a baby, a young woman told her nurses at Boston Medical Center that she was having pain in her hip. That happens sometimes after births, says Ali Guermazi, one of the doctors involved. As he recounts the case from a few years ago, he looked at X-rays and saw a small amount of extra fluid in the joint. Otherwise things looked normal. “We injected her hip with steroids, hoping to help with the pain,” Guermazi says. They seemed to help, and the women went home with her baby.

Guermazi didn’t think more of it until the woman returned to the hospital six months later, unable to walk. “The head of her femur was gone,” says Guermazi, who is now the chief of radiology at VA Boston Healthcare System. The bone appeared to have simply vanished. The new mother needed a total hip replacement. “We didn’t know what happened, and still can’t know for certain,” Guermazi says. “But I feared it was related to the injection.”

This is not a typical suspicion. Doctors have long considered a single injection of steroids—the type that come from the adrenal glands and modulate the body’s stress response—to be a pretty harmless way to temporarily relieve pain in a joint. The worst-case scenario was that the shot didn’t help the pain. Some people get temporary relief, and some do not. Such injections are done by podiatrists, rheumatologists, orthopedists, spine neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, and others at major hospitals around the world.

As a specialist in joint pain, Guermazi has done thousands of steroid injections over decades of work. He has trained other doctors as he was trained: to believe that the injections are safe as long as they aren’t overused. But now he has come to believe that the procedure is more dangerous than he knew. And he and a group of his Boston University colleagues are raising a warning flag for doctors and patients alike.

These less-than-promising findings tend to be overshadowed by anecdotes from many people who receive the injections and say they feel like they’ve magically received a new knee. Doctors and patients hoping to keep a person ambulatory, and to stave off a major surgery such as a joint replacement, might have a bias toward hoping that the injections are indeed a wise choice. Short on other options, steroid injections are still recommended in certain cases by the American College of Rheumatology and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International, with caution. The latest guidelines from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons equivocate on the injections, saying the evidence is not strong enough to recommend for or against them.

“The unfortunate thing is that there is no pharmaceutical treatment for osteoarthritis,” Guermazi says. The injections were only ever thought to be a temporary measure, but they were one of the few things in a doctor’s tool kit to help people with an often debilitating condition. “All the guidelines tell you to lose weight, exercise, and improve lifestyle. Those are the treatments,” Guermazi says.

He and his colleagues emphasized that two groups in particular should be cautious: young patients and anyone with pain that seems dramatically worse than might be expected (based on the history, imaging, and physical exam). Such disproportionate pain suggests a subtle problem that, perhaps, is being overlooked. Adding steroids to the mix could only make things worse, or delay an important finding. This may well have been the case for the young mother Guermazi treated. A tiny stress fracture could have been invisible in the X-ray. It would have required treatment by keeping weight off the leg. Instead, with steroids or a placebo creating some sense of relief, the woman felt able to walk on the hip, precipitating the collapse of the bone.

The procedure still likely has a role in helping people with arthritis in some cases, Guermazi believes. But he says that more research is “urgently needed” to help figure out what makes some people develop seemingly related complications, and how they might be prevented. Performing fewer injections could have massive financial ramifications for hospitals and doctors, and medicine is notoriously slow to change its ways in the face of new evidence. Fundamentally, though, Guermazi sees this as an ethical issue—as a matter of consent. Patients at least deserve to know about these possible complications. “As a doctor, I want to protect patients,” he says. “We are just saying we need to be careful.”

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]]> 38554 Toda tosse é alérgica? https://www.allergiesvscold.com/toda-tosse-e-alergica/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:34:36 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/toda-tosse-e-alergica/ A resposta é não. Nem toda tosse está envolvida com a alergia. O QUE É TOSSE  A tosse é um reflexo natural do organismo, indicando que alguma coisa “está fora de sintonia”. É um  mecanismo [...]

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A resposta é não. Nem toda tosse está envolvida com a alergia.

O QUE É TOSSE 

A tosse é um reflexo natural do organismo, indicando que alguma coisa “está fora de sintonia”. É um  mecanismo de defesa que o organismo lança mão para expulsar agentes nocivos das vias respiratórias, como, por exemplo: muco, agentes infecciosos, substâncias estranhas, secreções, poeira etc. A tosse também pode ser sintoma de diversas doenças, desde gripes, alergias, infecções, até situações graves da via respiratória..
A tosse incomoda a pessoa que tosse e às pessoas que estão à sua volta. Incomoda também os familiares, o que pode levar ao uso exagerado de medicamentos e xaropes caseiros, atrasando a identificação da casa e o tratamento medico adequado.

TIPOS DE TOSSE

A tosse pode ser seca ou produtiva. Na tosse produtiva, há eliminação de secreção ou catarro. Em casos especiais, pode ocorrer eliminação de sangue.
Pode ser uma tosse aguda (de início recente) ou uma tosse crônica (de duração arrastada, com mais de 6 semanas de duração).

CAUSAS PRINCIPAIS
As principais situações e doenças que podem levar à tosse são:
Tabagismo (cigarro, charuto, cachimbo, cigarros eletrônicos, etc.)
Gripes e resfriados, 
Rinite, secreções nasais, Sinusites
Asma
Refluxo de substâncias ácidas do estomago 
Engasgo, presença de material estranho
Medicamentos usados no tratamento da hipertensão arterial
Doenças pulmonares 
Doenças cardiovasculares. 

O QUE É TOSSE ALÉRGICA?

A expressão “tosse alérgica” não é um diagnóstico. É empregada quando há suspeita de que a tosse possa ser resultante de uma doença de origem alérgica.  
Dizemos que não é um diagnóstico, pois é preciso identificar a causa do sintoma. Por exemplo, a rinite alérgica pode ocasionar a chamada secreção “pós-nasal”, ou seja, gotejamento de catarro da parte posterior do nariz em direção à garganta, provocando o sintoma. Contudo, a asma também pode se manifestar por tosse, em especial relacionada ao riso, aos esforços ou à noite.

O diagnóstico se  baseia na análise clínica feita pelo especialista e os métodos variam em cada paciente, seja uma criança, um adulto ou um idoso. Os dados do histórico clínico; a forma com que a tosse se manifesta, características, doenças concomitantes, uso de medicamentos. etc. Além disso, exames complementares e testes alérgicos confirmarão o diagnóstico.

TRATAMENTO DA TOSSE

O tipo de tratamento depende do diagnóstico, ou seja, do reconhecimento da causa e dos fatores envolvidos na tosse. 

                                               A tosse não é uma doença! 

É um sintoma e deve ser pesquisado para identificar a causa.
Procure atendimento médico. 
Xaropes não resolvem se a causa não for detectada e tratada
A natureza nos presenteia diariamente com plantas e flores proporcionando uma festa não apenas para os olhos mas para todos os sentidos. A sua utilidade prática é indiscutível e múltipla, seja purificando o ar, seja servindo como alimento ou como base para construção de habitações, na manufatura de mobiliário, utensílios, cosméticos, medicamentos, entre tantas outras aplicações. Se apenas tivessem o papel de embelezar, já seriam fundamentais, aliviando a dureza do cotidiano e transmitindo paz numa convivência harmoniosa de longa data com o ser humano.
Mas, em algumas situações, a pele pode desenvolver reações quando entra em contato com plantas e daí pode coçar, se tornar vermelha, apresentar uma erupção cutânea e até inflamar. Estas reações surgem pelo contato com a pele, algumas puramente por irritação direta e outras, por mecanismo alérgico.
Até mesmo árvores podem produzir um eczema de contato alérgico, sendo o exemplo mais conhecido a Aroeira, uma árvore de madeira de alta resist…

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23 Problems Plus Size Girls Shouldn’t Have To Deal With In 2019 https://www.allergiesvscold.com/23-problems-plus-size-girls-shouldnt-have-to-deal-with-in-2019/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:34:34 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/23-problems-plus-size-girls-shouldnt-have-to-deal-with-in-2019/ *rolls eyes so hard* View Entire Post › Powered by WPeMatico

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*rolls eyes so hard*


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]]> 38550 21 Wild Injury Stories That I’m Still Laughing At https://www.allergiesvscold.com/21-wild-injury-stories-that-im-still-laughing-at/ Fri, 18 Oct 2019 13:34:33 +0000 https://allergiesvscold.com/21-wild-injury-stories-that-im-still-laughing-at/ “I managed to get out, and next day at the hospital (the pain got even worse and I could barely move), they found out I had broken a lumbar vertebrae. Oops. I had to undergo [...]

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“I managed to get out, and next day at the hospital (the pain got even worse and I could barely move), they found out I had broken a lumbar vertebrae. Oops. I had to undergo surgery, and now I have some titanium screws in my spine, which will forever remind me of my stupidity.”

kaa

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